Need Help With Organic Gardening? Try Using These Tips

Growing an organic garden might appear very complicated and involved, but if you know what you are doing, it can be a very exciting experience. If you don’t know what you are doing, you can waste a lot of money and watch alot of your plants die. The tips listed below can help you avoid this.

Making your own compost for organic gardening is extremely simple and easy to do. It provides soil of gardens with rich nutrients and keeps soil cool during summer months. You can use kitchen waste, sawdust, aquarium water, coffee grounds, tea leaves, rabbit or hamster droppings, a thin layer of lawn clippings, spices and eggshells in your compost.

You will need to rotate the plants on a regular basis when you have an indoor organic garden. Plants need to get light from all directions in order to grow properly. If they are not rotated, plants will bend toward a light source, which can actually cause them to produce less fruits and vegetables, than they would have if they had been rotated.

While Mother Nature will eventually do the work needed to create compost from a backyard pile, even if it is not actively tended, you can give her a helping hand by adding compost starter to the mix. Compost starters, available from the garden centers, add microorganisms to the soil that help speed up the decay process.

Recycling wood saves money and adds a unique touch to your garden. Use scrap wood to build small garden fences or support structures for plants. Sources include broken tables, chairs, or unused trim pieces from past home improvement projects. Paint the wood to add color and interest to your garden plot.

Use compost to feed your crops. In organic gardening, compost is necessary for the survival of your plants. A home compost pile is a great, inexpensive source of compost. Many food scraps, grass, and dry leaves can be used in your compost. However, avoid cooked foods, ash, and animal waste in an organic compost pile.

Plant synergistically. To naturally repel pests, plant marigolds near nematode-sensitive crops like tomatoes and potatoes. To improve growth, plant legumes near plants that can benefit from the nitrogen they produce. Intersperse pungent plants like herbs and onions, whose scent can repel bugs and animals, with other unscented vegetables.

If you have plants that love acid in your organic garden, especially tomato plants, then coffee grounds make great mulch. It’s simple to scatter the coffee grounds around your plants and then sit back and let the high levels of nitrogen help your acid-loving plants grow to great heights all summer long.

A carpenter’s belt is a great investment for any organic gardener. This is because organic gardening involves many small tools that are all frequently used such as trowels, water sprays, pruners, and gloves. Rather than making several trips back and forth between your shed and the garden, a tool belt can help you carry all of your tools at all times.

To rid your organic garden of bugs, try using a mixture of dish soap and water. Mix 2 tablespoons of dish soap into a gallon of water. Use a spray bottle to spray the foliage and soil around the plants. Before spraying your whole garden or even a whole plant, test the effect of the mixture on a few leaves and wait a few days before doing the rest.

So, as you can see growing an organic garden is not as complicated as it appears. It is involved in terms of research, hard work, and patience, but the personal rewards make it worth it in the end. With the above tips in mind, you should be smarter when it comes to growing your own organic garden.

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