How a Projector Can Substitute for a Television Set

I want to make clear that you can’t just put a projector where you had a TV and expect it to replace a TV in all situations. Any projector will usually fall short in terms of contrast ratio — the ratio of black to white — unless you’re spending at least $2,000. But, and this is key, you don’t see the benefits of that contrast ratio unless your room is completely dark with no ambient light. If there is any light in the room, it will wash out the black on a projector.

Which is why our favorite $2,000 projector is recommended for dedicated home-theater rooms. In a living room, you wouldn’t really see the benefits.

What do you recommend for a living room?

We really like the BenQ HT2050 projector that sells for around $740. It is really bright, runs quietly, and it is much more accurate for colors than many of its competitors. The more expensive models from BenQ offer slightly better image quality, but not enough to justify the price increase.

And if I do convert my basement to a theater?

The Sony VPL-HW45ES is our current home theater recommendation. For around $2,000, it has contrast ratios almost five times better than the BenQ because the blacks are much darker. It also has very accurate colors. As a result, the image just pops off the screen. It is also more adjustable so it’s easier to find the perfect position in any room.

How did you test these things?

The testing room is in my house. It was a bit of a requirement when we went home buying last year.

I have a completely light-sealed testing room, with a 92-inch screen. I didn’t make the room an all-black cave or anything. It’s a neutral gray like you’d find in a lot of modern homes. I installed a blackout roller shade in the window, put up trim pieces on the sides of it to cut off any extra light, and then covered the window on the door. I really need to replace it with a windowless one.

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