Hot Spot for Tech Outsourcing: The United States

Salaries have risen in places like South Asia, making outsourcing there less of a bargain. In addition, as brands pour energy and money into their websites and mobile apps, more of them are deciding that there is value in having developers in the same time zone, or at least on the same continent.

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Mark Orttung, the chief executive of Nexient, which is based in Newark, Calif., but set up centers in Michigan and Indiana to tap workers who didn’t want to leave the Midwest.

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Jason Henry for The New York Times

Many of these domestic outsourcers are private, little-known companies like Rural Sourcing, Catalyte, Eagle Creek Software Services and Onshore Outsourcing. But IBM, one of the country’s foremost champions of the offshore outsourcing model, has announced plans to hire 25,000 more workers in the United States over the next four years.

As a result, the growth of offshore software work is slowing, to nearly half the pace of recent years.

“The nature of work is changing,” said Vishal Sikka, chief executive of Infosys, an Indian outsourcing giant. “It is very local. And you often need whole teams locally,” a departure from the offshore formula of having a project manager on-site but the work done abroad.

“It’s not enough to have people offshore in India,” he added.

Infosys announced in May that it planned to hire 10,000 workers in the United States over the next two years, starting with centers in Indiana and North Carolina.

The offshore industry is not imperiled, analysts say. But from 2016 to 2021, the offshore services industry will have average yearly growth of 8 percent, the research firm IDC estimated. The rate in the previous five years was 15 percent.

“Domestic sourcing is here to stay, and it’s going to grow rapidly,” said Helen Huntley, an analyst at the research firm Gartner.

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Nexient’s new…

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