Apple follows in Google's footsteps, bans cryptocurrency mining on iPhones, iPads

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Preventing cryptocurrency mining is crucial on iOS because this untethered mining operations can easily overheat or destroy batteries -or even devices if the battery case deforms, leaks, or catches fire.

Cupertino's new dev rules restrict apps that drain the battery, put unnecessary strain on an iPhone's or iPad's resources, and cause the fancy gadgets to generate excessive heat. That's 52.2 Million news homes for the wealth of App Store apps that are being created, under these new Apple guidelines. According to a report by CNBC, the tech giant recently updated developer guidelines, shifting its stance toward mining for digital currencies like bitcoin.

In an update to the Hardware Compatibility section of its developer guidelines, Apple said "apps, including any third party advertisements displayed with them, may not run unrelated background processes, such as cryptocurrency mining". It should be noted that the upcoming smartphones such as HTC Exodus and the Sirin Finney that support Blockchain will also not be able to have power to handle cryptocurrency mining. The move comes at a time when 'cryptojacking', a malware attack wherein malicious attackers scrumptiously hijack a computer or a phone's computing power to mine cryptocurrencies, is a growing menace. The only exception is for "cloud-based mining", in which the virtual currencies are remotely generated off the Apple product.

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The new rules ban any app from directly mining cryptocurrency. Initial offerings including futures investments, or other securities dealing with cryptocurrencies must be offered by an established bank, securities firm or exchange. It also gathers information about users' devices, their location, apps installed on the gadgets and how people use those apps, what websites they visit, and the amount of data used, Facebook wrote in answers to Congressional questions that the social network operator posted online Monday.

Featured image from Shutterstock.

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