Google Testing Self Destructing Email For Gmail

Adjust Comment Print

Earlier this week we delivered word of Google's forthcoming revamp of its Gmail web client, likely to officially debut at the I/O conference next month.

Google's Gmail is one of the most popular email services worldwide.

But while the leaked screenshots showed numerous big changes in Gmail, info about a new feature that lets users send self-destructing emails is only starting to trickle out now.

According to a new report from The Verge, Google will also be introducing a new "Confidential Mode", which lets users stop recipients from forwarding certain emails.

As presented by TechCrunch, a small lock icon appears in the compose window for an email which represents "Confidential Mode". As per some screenshots, users will be able to set an expiration date so that the sent email disappears or is unreadable after a week or several years depending on what they choose.

Seahawks postponed Kaepernick workout after he declined to stop anthem protests
After sitting out the entire 2017 season, Kaepernick held a throwing workout on a practice field in Houston last month. While the anthem protests eventually died down last season, during the owner's meeting the topic was brought back up.

TechCrunch states that the feature isn't ready yet, as their source arrived at a non-existent page after clicking on the "Learn more" option to open Google's help articles. When someone receives an email sent with Confidential Mode, it will contain an embedded link that will allow them to view the secure content. It further states that the recipient won't be able to forward, download or copy the email's contents, and attachments will be disabled. That means the email will be deleted from recipient's account automatically.

"The crime and punishment information has become out of date, irrelevant and of no sufficient legitimate interest to users of Google Search to justify its continued availability, so that an appropriate delisting order should be made", Justice Warby of the High Court said, The Telegraph reported.

End-to-end encryption is also not mentioned by Google anywhere.

The password-protecting of email is something that will be welcomed by many users, and it is going to be implemented through the use of a code sent out via SMS.

Comments